Alicia Lopez’s Musings

Archive for July 2010

There has never been a time when I have not been proud of my country.  When the Star Spangled Banner is played, I get chills up and down my spine, and the flag , proudly waving, brings tears to my eyes.  I am proud to state that I am a true Red, White, and Blue citizen, who also happens to be Hispanic.

This is the reason that I have decided to state my views on the recent controversy surrounding the new law passed by the state of Arizona.  In my opinion it is blatantly racist.  If a police officer stops a car driven by a blonde blue eyed citizen, for whatever infraction committed, does he ask for proof of citizenship?  No, this is only done when the driver happens to have brown skin, dark hair, and looks of Hispanic origin.  Then he or she is asked, in Spanish, for proof of the right to be in this country.  If this isn’t bigotry, racist, and whatever word you wish to call it, what is?

I never thought I would live to see the day when almost fifty percent of the population including myself,  would have to carry passports.  Is this the good old USA, land of the free, and home of the brave?

I don’t live in Arizona, and will skip that state on any of my travels.  If you wish to live in la-la land and believe it is all a big lie, ask someone you know who has endured this harassment several times, like my daughter in-law’s brother who happens to live in Phoenix, and now carries his passport.

At one time, before the word Hispanic came into being, we were simply called Mexican-Americans, and we laughingly referred to ourselves as the hyphenated ones.  Our men served their country honorably, going to war and dying to protect our homes and rights.  Of any ethnic group, ours has the most Medal of Honor winners.

At one time, before World War II, there was discrimination, sometimes blatant, in my home state of Texas.  If you were job searching, the want ads stated “Only Anglos need apply”.  In some restaurants we were denied service, and growing up, I never knew of any doctors, lawyers, head of companies, who had Spanish sir-names.  This all changed when the men came home with the knowledge that a different, better world existed out there.  They went to college on the G I Bill of Rights, knowing that with an education, they would provide a new, better world for their children. My grandparents, who came to this country with nothing but their dreams, would be proud of their offspring’s accomplishments.

There is still some discrimination, although obscurely hidden, but then there has  been, and will always exist, bigotry in many shapes and forms.  Sad isn’t it?

Today, I am proud to say, we are in every conceivable career available to all citizens, including having the first Hispanic Supreme Court Justice.

Arizona dares to question this?  Let our Federal government solve the immigration problem; isn’t the Constitution the law of the land, including that  of the sun-drenched state?

There, I have vented, and feel a lot better.  Letting off steam sometimes helps.

HAPPY JULY 4TH!  SAVOR YOUR FREEDOM

Hasta La Vista

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